How to deal with the naysayers

How to deal with the naysayers

Wherever you go, there will be naysayers. Everyone encounters them. So, figuring out what to do with them is better time spent than trying to avoid them. They’ll come in surprising forms anyway. They might be your parents, a friend, a teacher, a boss, or somebody you look up to.

When you feel deep in your bones that you know what you’re made to do, find someone you trust, who genuinely likes you, and has your best interest in mind and run it by them. You’ll likely get a response like “of course that’s what you should be doing, I’m not the least bit surprised.” Not sure who these people are? They’re the ones who were honest when you asked them about that one person you were dating, they’re there through all the highs and lows, you know you can tell them anything without being judged all the while they’ll be honest with you.

And then as you start sharing it with others, you’re going to encounter people who might not be excited for you.

What You Really Should Know About Influence

What You Really Should Know About Influence

Newly in my position I was standing in front of a group of parents whom I didn't know very well yet. I was giving them all the details about a week-long canoe trip in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area (BWCA) for their high schoolers. After I shared an enthusiastic and detailed vision for everything the week would entail, I confidently asked if there were any questions. I was pretty sure there wouldn’t be any as I had laid out all the details and now it was simply time for their kids to sign up!

Well, the questions came pouring in and it soon became obvious that the parents didn’t trust me. I was dumbfounded. To my knowledge, I had never been mistrusted in my life. This was uncharted territory. Not only that, but I had spent countless summers leading multi-day camping, canoeing, and sailing trips. My credentials were impeccable. I was made to lead a trip like this!

Real Self-Care Tips for Leaders

Real Self-Care Tips for Leaders

We all know that we have to avoid burnout, or deal with the eventual consequences. And, we all know as well, these consequences don’t just affect us, they affect everyone around us: our team, our personal relationships, our quality of life, our health, and so much more.

When I was burning the candle on both ends, I could do it for a few weeks and then I’d inevitably get sick and be laid up for a week. Then the cycle would repeat itself. And believe me, I was trying to live a healthy life by working out regularly, learning how to eat better, and sleeping well. Doing those things probably helped keep me from getting sicker than I already was, but they weren’t enough to help me avoid the inevitable burnout.

We all know the right things to do to take care of ourselves. So it isn’t so much about finding time for self-care, it’s more about making time for self-care. But how do we do that when there’s always something else to do, something else vying for our time?

Why do they do that, it’s so rude!

Why do they do that, it’s so rude!

We were grabbing dinner at the local open-air restaurant on a hot Tanzanian night. My Swedish friend across the table wondered aloud why the waiter had left her bottle top on our table after having opened her coke, wasn’t that rude? While a smile on his face, our Tanzanian friend nicely rested the bottle top back over the opening of her coke bottle and replied, “because now you can cover your coke and keep the bugs out.” Touché.

So often what we label as rude, weird, or annoying about the actions and behaviors of people from different cultures is simply different. When we understand why other people do the things they do, more often than not it makes total sense.

When I work with people traveling internationally, one of the biggest limiting beliefs they have to overcome is “my culture is right, theirs is wrong.”

The #1 Mindset Every Leader Must Develop

The #1 Mindset Every Leader Must Develop

With the expansion of globalization and rapid advancements in technology, cross-cultural interactions around the globe are at an all-time high. No longer are cultures bound by their geographic borders. Local developments be they technological, political, social, economic or environmental can now have instantaneous global impact. With news available 24-7 around the world, people are more aware than ever before of what is happening globally, and businesses and organizations are affected more quickly than ever before by events in far reaching places. Take the 2008 economic crisis in the United States for example, its impact was felt way beyond the United States’ geographical borders.

Today’s leaders must integrate an appreciation of global dynamics and cross-cultural competencies into their leadership framework.