leader

How do you avoid the pitfalls when trying to make a difference?

How do you avoid the pitfalls when trying to make a difference?

Making a difference in the world isn’t just a passion for many people, it’s becoming the pursuit of more organizations and businesses. More businesses and organizations than ever before are becoming socially conscious as more and more people demand it, inside and outside their organizations, the world over.

The benefits of this movement are substantial for local communities, as well as the businesses and organizations that pursue it. In servant leadership led organizations, as people care for each other within organizations, people begin to care more for those outside their organizations. An awareness and desire to help those most in need throughout society increases. And, as organizations who embrace an “others first” philosophy thrive, they are better able to increasingly turn their attention to meeting needs in their surrounding community.

The downsides of this movement can be just as substantial unless…

Chaotic much? Let's look at your values

Chaotic much? Let's look at your values

From chaotic schedules to needing to swoop in to “save the day” to rogue goals and strategies, one culprit is behind them all: values.  Whether working solo or leading a non-profit or Fortune 500, when the values in use are not clear, neither is anything else.

Question whether or not you’re a leader? If you have influence over the direction of a group of people, you are a leader.  That does not mean you a good leader, but it does mean that people are looking at you to help them achieve a common goal, and therefore makes you a leader (even if momentarily).  If you work ‘alone,’ but have customers (find me someone who works but has no customers…that would be a hobby, right?) or a graphic designer or a web designer or a printer, you function in a leadership capacity to a degree.

And those people you lead crave one major thing: clarity.

Feedback, should we use it?

Feedback, should we use it?

Our dreams for our organizations, products, and services go long into the future.  Whether or not we get there depends in large part on what we do with feedback.  Being around for the long haul means we must, as my dad would say, continually meet or exceed our customers’ expectations.  The last thing we want to do is over-promise and under-deliver.  Nothing is more aggravating to customers than feeling like they were not told the whole truth (be it about costs, timelines, quality, etc.).

The reality is that with the expansion of globalization and development of technology, today’s environment has become increasingly volatile, ambiguous, changing and uncertain (VACU) as George Ritzer and Paul Dean put it in their book, Globalization.  This means that innovation becomes critical for anyone seeking to meet or exceed their customers’ expectations into the future.  Why?